End Illiteracy in English

The problem of English functional illiteracy is a very real nightmare, but the solution is easier than you would ever dare to dream.

Does It Matter?

Does it matter that I just completed work on an authoritative new End English Functional Illiteracy Now website describing the serious problem of English functional illiteracy and a proven way to end it? Does it matter to you that almost half of U.S. adults cannot read and write well enough to hold a job that earns enough to support themselves? Chances are good that you do not believe that. Does that matter? No.

What we believe does not change the truth. At one time almost everyone in the world believed that the earth was flat. Did that belief keep the world from being a sphere? All human beings can choose to believe or disbelieve anything we wish. We are made that way. Sometimes we see proof that what we believe is not true. We do not like being wrong, so sometimes the proof is not enough. Have you ever had the experience of proving something to someone you are arguing with and seeing them a couple of days later, and they say, “There must be something wrong with that argument. I still believe. . . .“? Then they repeat what they believed before you showed them the proof.

Sometimes we must see the proof over and over in such a way that we cannot continue to hold onto our wrong belief. Human beings passionately dislike being wrong. Sometimes we have wrong beliefs because we will not take the time to honestly look at proof of something we do not want to believe. We do not want to believe that huge numbers of our fellow Americans are having really serious problems because they are illiterate. There are many people who claim to be compassionate about fellow Americans who are in poverty. A far smaller number of people ever do anything about it.

Many of us say, correctly, that we just barely make enough money to support ourselves at the level to which we have become accustomed. Many celebrities earn much more than enough to help many people in poverty. But most of them don’t. Most of them do not even investigate enough to learn that functional illiterates are more than twice as likely to be in poverty because of their illiteracy as for all other causes combined. Even if they are aware of that fact, most of them are too busy and too self-important to do anything about it.

IF you are truly compassionate about the suffering of an estimated 600 hundred million English-speaking people around the world who are functionally illiterate in English (more than 93 million in the U.S. alone) you are challenged to read the report titled Adult Literacy in America, available for free download from http://nces.ed.gov/pubs93/93275.pdf and see the calculations using the data from that report on page “2. Extent of the Problem” on my new http://LearnToReadNow.org website. Page “3. Why We Do Not See the Extent of the Problem” on my website explains why we may not believe the problem as serious as it really is.

IF you think that there may be lots of illiterates in the U.S., but the problems they face are really not all that bad, you are challenged to read page “4. The Seriousness of the Problem” on my new blog. IF you do not think that changing the spelling is really necessary or will really solve the problem, you are challenged to read pages “5. English Spelling Confuses Everyone,” “6. The Solution in a Nutshell,” and “8. Characteristics of NuEnglish” on my new website.

IF you read the pages mentioned in the two previous paragraphs and IF you are at least a little compassionate, you will want to help. Read page “10. Learn to Read Now!” on my new website and teach a functional illiterate to read and/or post a comment at the end of that page with nothing more than the next number in sequence, your full name, and your city and state, which will put you on a petition to educational and political authorities that you want NuEnglish taught in at least some of the kindergartens in your area as a very worthwhile trial.

I know — we are all busy. We all have our priorities: our relationship with God, our family, our job, and our hobbies and entertainment — not necessarily in that order, of course. But honestly now, couldn’t we do something out of compassion for our fellowman instead of one or two of the thirty minute TV programs we had planned to watch?

posted by in cause of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,U.S. literacy,world literacy and have No Comments

The Only Proven Solution to Our Educational Problems

Before I begin, there are two problems in reading this blog. Problem one: You may have doubts that some unknown (non-celebrity) blogger can really present a proven solution to the serious U.S. educational problems. Your curiosity may keep you reading just long enough to confirm your suspicion in this age that many have called “The Age of Skepticism.” Can you spare 12 minutes from your busy schedule for something of importance to at least 600 million English-speaking people — including yourself? That is how long it will take to read this entire blog. Problem two: You may think that even if this blog does present a proven solution to the problem, you personally cannot do anything to help solve the problem. Like many other people, you may believe that it is not your problem — you believe it should be (and hopefully will be) solved by the “experts:” the educational and political authorities.

Despite these problems — whether or not you believe it — here are the facts. Dr. Frank Charles Laubach spent almost his entire adult life teaching thousands of adult illiterates around the world how to read. He taught in more than 300 alphabetic languages other than English. He prepared reading primers in 313 languages and even invented spelling systems for 220 languages that were unwritten. His books, Teaching the World to Read and Forty Years With the Silent Billion, document a truly amazing fact about the languages in which he taught. He was able to teach adults to read fluently in from one to twenty days in 95% of the languages and in less than three months in 98% of the languages! His books never mention being unable to teach any of his students to read fluently.

Dr. Laubach was able quickly to teach his students to read fluently because 98% of these languages had an almost perfect phonemic spelling system. A perfect spelling system has only one grapheme for each phoneme. In alphabetic languages, a grapheme is a letter or digraph (two letters) that represents a phoneme, syllable or word. A phoneme is the smallest sound used to distinguish between syllables or words in a language or dialect.

Teachers will tell you that reading is the foundation of nearly all learning. Students need fluent reading ability for class work, homework, and testing in almost every subject. Why then do almost half of Americans never become fluent readers? Analysis of a report released by the U.S. Department of Education in April 2002 titled Adult Literacy in America proves this is true — and the follow-up report released in 2006 confirms it. The answer is very simple: English is not an alphabetic language. English is more like Chinese writing that uses specific shapes in specific positions to represent a word. English uses a specific combination of letters in a specific order to represent a word.

Apologists for the present method of teaching reading will tell you that most English words are phonemic. That is true only if you allow more than one spelling of the phonemes. Some apologists will even go to the extreme of calling English “a beautiful language” and will defend our “mother tongue” against all attacks — despite the difficulty that beginning readers and especially immigrants have in learning to read. The truth is that if each of the 38 English phonemes that are needed to learn to read are allowed only ONE specific spelling, only about 20% of English words are phonemic. More than one spelling of the phonemes requires a huge amount of memorization when some of the phonemes can be spelled in as many as more than 60 ways and the spelling of each phoneme varies from one word to the next.

The problem is that there is absolutely no way of knowing which words are phonemic and which are not (other than memorizing 20% of about two million English words). It is easier just to learn to recognize, by sight, the spelling of every word in your reading vocabulary — which is EXACTLY what every reader of English MUST do! Almost every American can read about a thousand simple words they learn by memory in the first three grades in school. In order to be a fluent reader, however, one must be able to recognize the spelling of 20,000 words or more. Many fluent readers have reading vocabularies of more than 70,000 English words. Recognizing a word by its spelling and its context is much easier than remembering that spelling when trying to write the word.

Professor Julius Nyikos of Washington and Jefferson College did an extensive study* of six standard desk dictionaries. He found 1,768 ways of spelling 40 phonemes! If he had used unabridged dictionaries he would have undoubtedly found even more. Other apologists for our present spelling will say that you can learn to read using spelling rules. The truth is that there is not even ONE spelling rule that does not have exceptions. Some of the exceptions even have exceptions! A computer programmed** with 203 English spelling rules was able correctly to spell only 49% of a list of 17,000 common English words. Can we honestly expect the average human to do better?

Adding to the difficulty of learning to read is the fact that English has more consonant clusters than many other languages. English spelling has consonant cluster of two or three letters. As a result there are sixteen different patterns for spelling syllables: (C = consonant phoneme, V = vowel phoneme): CV, CCV, CCCV, CVC, CCVC, CCCVC, CVCC, CVCCC, CCVCC, CCVCCC, CCCVCCC, CCCVCC, VCCC, VCC, VC, and V. There are five consonant phonemes spelled with digraphs (CH, SH, TH, ZH, and NG) and the TH grapheme represents two different phonemes (as in thin and then). In addition, each vowel phoneme can be spelled with as many as FIVE letters. (There are at least four vowel phonemes spelled with five letters. The most familiar is the word weighed, in which the letters EIGHE all represent the same vowel phoneme as in the word wade.) Each syllable in a word can have any one of these patterns. Most English words have two or more syllables. If each vowel and each consonant in these syllables always represented the same sound (one-to-one mapping, an “equivalence” relationship), there would be nothing in the logic of these syllables that would be beyond the abilities of most four- or five-year-olds, but they do not.

English spelling also has one-to-one mapping where one phoneme is represented by one digraph — since there are not enough letters to represent all of the phonemes. Almost half of English phonemes are represented by digraphs. In traditional English spelling there are also three-, four-, and even five-letter graphemes representing a single phoneme. More than half of all English phonemes are spelled with graphemes of two or more letters. But the real confusion comes since there is also one-to-many and many-to-one mapping, i.e., one phoneme is represented by many different graphemes (for spelling), and one grapheme represents many phonemes (for reading). This requires a type of logic that most children do not develop until they are eleven or twelve years old.

There are two types of logic required for one-to-many and many-to-one mapping. Type One is the logic of “classes,” categories where objects or events that are similar are grouped together, and “relations” (where objects share some features but not all features, e.g., all poodles are dogs, but all dogs are not poodles). Type Two is “propositional logic,” which involves combining both the classes and relations types of logic. This requires the ability to think of the same item in more than one combination at the same time. These combinations require the use of relational terms such as “and,” “or,” “not,” “if-then,” and “if and only if” in formal statements of propositional logic. One example of the problem of digraphs can be stated as: If an h follows the letter t, then say /th/ (thin) or /th/ (then); but if any other letter or no letter follows the letter t, then say /t/ (top, ant).

It is usually a waste of time to try to get students less than about twelve years old to understand the logic — they just have to be helped to memorize (or learn by repetition) the spelling of new words. We do not realize the difficulty of learning to read English — especially when compared to languages with a phonemic spelling system — because most of us learned to read as a child and have long since forgotten (or proudly dismiss) the difficulty. Our eyes skip easily over a multitude of traps for beginning readers.

Based upon his many years of teaching students of phonemic languages to read fluently, Dr. Laubach stated on page 48 of his book Forty Years With the Silent Billion, “If we spelled English phonetically, American children could be taught to read in a week.” Although present educational and political authorities may have a financial interest in believing that this is overly optimistic, it would be a mistake to discount Dr. Laubach’s findings and his advice. With our present inconsistent and illogical spelling, most U.S. students require at least two years to become fluent readers — and almost half of the students never become fluent readers. Statistics prove that almost half of adults never read an entire book after they leave school. If English spelling were as simple and logical as most other languages, the better students could learn to read in one week and all but the most mentally challenged students could learn to read in less than three months — for many (if not most) students, much less than three months.

Literacy Research Associates, Inc. and NuEnglish, Inc., two non-profit educational corporations, have developed and perfected a perfect phonemic spelling system such as Dr. Laubach recommended. It is a spelling system called NuEnglish, which has ten beneficial characteristics that no other known proposed spelling system can claim. Adoption of this spelling system is the only proven way permanently to end English functional illiteracy. More than 93 million adult Americans can read only about a thousand simple words they learned in the first three grades in school. They read so poorly that they do not like to read and seldom attempt to do so. They read so poorly that they cannot hold an above-poverty-level-wage job. Although they can read about a thousand words, they are functionally illiterate. Along with an estimated 500 million English-speaking adults around the world who are also functionally illiterate in English, they desperately need our help to avoid the problems, pain, and suffering their illiteracy causes — at least 34 different types of serious physical, mental, emotional, medical, and financial problem that we would consider a crisis if we had to endure them. Our end English functional illiteracy website gives the details of the problem, proving that 48.7% of U.S. adults are functionally illiterate, proving that 31.2% of these functional illiterates are in poverty, and proving that they are more than twice as likely to be in poverty because of their illiteracy as for all other reasons combined. Our website also explains the details of how functional illiteracy causes serious problems not only for the illiterates but also for every other U.S. citizen and for our nation.

When you learned that we are proposing spelling reform, you may have thought of one or two reasons why we should not change the spelling. Numerous respected scholars, however, have thoroughly debunked every reasonable objection to spelling reform — not only in the last few years but even as far back as 1909, when Thomas Lounsbury, LL.D., L.H.D., professor emeritus of English at Yale University wrote his book, English Spelling and Spelling Reform. Dr. Lounsbury presented a devastating attack against our present English spelling and against objections to spelling reform. In 1909, however — unlike today, there were a multitude of manual labor jobs that did not require literacy. Furthermore, Dr. Lounsbury harmed his cause by not proposing a specific spelling system.

Numerous scholars have also presented details of the benefits of making the spelling of our words as easy to learn as those of other languages. It does not take a genius to know that it is much easier to learn the spelling of 38 phonemes — and how to blend them into words — than to memorize the spelling of twenty thousand words. By learning to read quickly, English-speaking students can — at long last — compete with students in other languages by studying most subjects about two years earlier. The award-winning breakthrough book, Let’s End Our Literacy Crisis, Second Revision, which is available at no cost or obligation on our end English functional illiteracy website (at the bottom of the left-hand column), lists the disproven objections to spelling reform and lists the benefits of making our spelling consistent and logical.

There are roughly 600 million people around the world hoping you can help them escape from English functional illiteracy. If you consider yourself to be a compassionate person, all you need to do to begin the process of ending illiteracy in English is to help publicize the solution to their illiteracy. I have been passionately working on this problem for 27 years, and I KNOW — as an absolute fact — that what I am proposing will not only solve the problem but will also be much easier than you or almost anyone else may believe — until the facts are honestly evaluated. As a result, I am humbly asking that you tell at least three people about this blog who have not seen it yet. When enough people know the seriousness of the problem and how easy the solution will really be, the problem will be solved. To believe otherwise is to underestimate the human will to help ourselves, despite all the naysayers and all those who oppose change — even change for the better.

* Nyikos, Julian, “A Linguistic Perspective of Functional Illiteracy,” The Fourteenth LACUS Forum 1987 (Lake Bluff, Illinois: Linguistic Association of Canada and the United States, 1988), pp. 146-163.

** Hanna, Paul R., et. al. Phoneme-Grapheme Correspondence as Cues to Spelling Improvement. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Education, 1966.

posted by in cause of illiteracy,cost of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,teaching fluent reading,teaching reading,U.S. literacy,world literacy and have No Comments

America’s Dirty Little Secret, II

Please follow this link to see a very important August 16, 2012 blog about ending our literacy crisis. Placing this blog on more than one website would result in a search engine optimization downgrade.

posted by in cause of illiteracy,cost of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,teaching fluent reading,teaching reading,world literacy and have No Comments

Challenge: I Bet You Don’t Know How Few American Adults Can Read Well

If you have not carefully analyzed the most accurate and complete study of U.S. adult literacy ever commissioned by the U.S. government, you DO NOT know the seriousness of this well-hidden problem.

The media have not accurately reported on this study. There are several possible reasons. Reporters are in a hurry to get their report out before another news media reports it, so they only read the Executive Summary. Or they read the report of the study, but the study does not carefully detail the meaning of some of the data that are contained in the report of the study. Or they do not want to upset the educational and political leaders by highlighting the very serious nature of the problem.

Whatever the reason, the shocking facts reported in the 1993 Adult Literacy in America study report (see http://nces.ed.gov/pubs93/93275.pdf) have been largely ignored. This is true even though the results of this report were confirmed by a report issued in 2006 (see http://nces.ed.gov/NAAL/PDF/2006470.PDF). The Adult Literacy in America study was a five-year, $14 million study involving extensive interviews of 26,049 U.S. adults statistically chosen by age, gender, ethnicity, and location (urban, suburban, and rural locations in twelve states across the U.S. and including 1100 prisoners from 80 prisons) to represent the entire U.S. population. The 2006 report was prepared by the same group as the 1993 report, but it used a database of 19,714 interviewees.

The Adult Literacy in America study gave the interviewees written material to read and then tested how they responded to what they had read. They divided the interviewees into five groups, depending upon how well they responded. The two least literate groups totaled 48.7% of the interviewees. The average annual earnings of these two groups were well below the threshold poverty level earnings for an individual in 1993 according to the U.S. Census Bureau!

There are several methods used to determine functional literacy in English. By far the most accurate method of determining functional literacy is the wages that employers are willing to pay to employ workers who can read and write well enough to be a profitable employee. Employers have a strong financial incentive to determine accurately how well their prospective employee can read and write. No other method of determining literacy has such a strong incentive for accuracy. In fact, researchers may very well have reasons for wanting their literacy determinations to show certain results.

Almost all American adults can read a thousand or more simple words they learned in the first three grades in school. A careful analysis of the data in the Adult Literacy in America study, however, proves conclusively—as shocking and as unbelievable as it may be—that 48.7% of U.S. adults are functionally illiterate. It also proves that 31.2% of these functional illiterates are in poverty and that they are more than twice as likely to be in poverty because of their illiteracy as for all other reasons combined.

After many years of research, Literacy Research Associates, Inc. and NuEnglish, Inc. (two non-profit educational corporations) have perfected a proven, easy-to-implement solution to the very serious problem of English functional illiteracy. Our nine websites explain the seriousness and the solution to the problem of illiteracy. Our “home” websites are http://NuEnglish.org and http://EveryoneCanReadNow.com. Our http://LearnToReadNow.com website gives the best introduction to our humanitarian project of ending our very real literacy crisis. No website, however, can give the understandable, progressive, and complete revelation of all the facts that may be needed to spur readers to action that is almost certain after a careful reading of our breakthrough book, Let’s End Our Literacy Crisis, Revised Edition available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/1589824970. If more than 500 million English-speaking people around the world who are functionally illiterate in English (including more than 93 million in the U.S. alone) knew the choice facing you at this moment, they would urge you to get this book and carefully read it.

posted by in cause of illiteracy,cost of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,K-12 education,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,teaching fluent reading,teaching reading,U.S. literacy,world literacy and have No Comments

Many People Avoid Badly-Needed Changes. . . . Do You?

Caution: this is important to you and to all of us, but it is not “light-reading.” Are you up to the challenge?

Many people resist change, even a change to something that is better. This is because people often prefer to continue the inconvenience of the known instead changing to achieve the proven benefits of the unknown. People often continue to resist change until it becomes a crisis that they cannot continue to ignore. I hesitate to use the following example because it is so trivial compared to the shockingly large problem of English functional illiteracy, but it is a perfect example of avoiding change until a crisis occurs that cannot be ignored.

In a Western U.S. city, which shall remain nameless, there is a straight stretch of road almost a half-mile long which has only one intersection — near the middle. The speed limit on the road is 50 mph, but cars often go 65 mph. People who live near the intersection often want to enter the road at the intersection. The only way to avoid entering the road at this intersection, on one side of the road, is to go almost a mile out of the way along a slow twisty-turny, uphill road through the neighborhood and stop at a stop sign and then later a traffic light. People on the other side of the road have an even longer path to avoid entering at this intersection. People who want to enter the road at this intersection complained to city officials for years about the need for a stop light there because of the danger and because of many near-misses they encountered. Because of the high cost, city officials resisted the change for many years — which those in the neighborhood considered a crisis. A traffic light was not installed, however, until after someone was killed in a car wreck at the intersection.

Political and educational officials have been avoiding any truly EFFECTIVE changes in the method of teaching reading in the U.S. for more than ninety years. Almost a hundred million functionally illiterate people in the U.S. are affected by our “car-wreck” of a system for teaching reading. There are several reasons. Political and educational officials make small changes hoping it will solve the problem and then hope no one will really notice that the change has not made a statistically significant improvement. Parents may see reports about the problems in the schools but are firmly convinced that the school(s) their child(ren) attend(s) (or to which they move their offspring) is a very good school. They believe this because they want to — they do not know what else they can do. In short, everyone involved, politicians, educational officials, teachers, and parents, do not know how to solve the problem and do not want to take a chance on anything they consider too “radical.” Some critical problems, such as the problem of English functional illiteracy, however, cannot be solved by merely “tweaking” the existing system — as has been done many times in the last ninety years (at an increasing pace since the 1983 “Nation At Risk” educational report. This report concluded that if a foreign nation had imposed upon us our present, ineffective educational system, we would consider it an act of war.)

The good news is that the discovery of Literacy-Research Associates, Inc. and NuEnglish, Inc., (two non-profit educational corporations) and the perfection of the method they discovered for solving the problem of English functional illiteracy has been proven to solve the problem. Dr. Frank Laubach, perhaps the world’s greatest authority on teaching illiterates around the world to read, taught in more than 300 alphabetic languages. In 95% of these languages, he could teach adults to read fluently in from one to twenty days! In some simpler languages, such as one or more dialects of the Philippine language, he could teach adults to read in one hour! In 98% of these languages, he could teach his students to read fluently in less than three months. In fact, Dr. Laubach invented spelling systems for 220 languages. In Dr. Laubach’s books, Teaching the World to Read and Forty Years With the Silent Billion, he never mentioned even one student that he was unable to teach to read. All of this was possible because all of these written languages were logical and consistent.

Present English spelling — on the other hand — is illogical, inconsistent, and chaotic. Most of us who can read learned to read as a child and have long ago forgotten the difficulty we had. Our eyes skip easily over a multitude of traps for beginning readers.  Although there are many reasons why any one student may not learn to read, there is only one problem that affects every student — the illogical, inconsistent spelling. Our ridiculous spelling is the fundamental, root cause of functional illiteracy. To see proof of that statement, click here. As far as grammar and syntax are concerned, English is neither the easiest nor the most difficult, but English spelling is by far the most illogical, inconsistent, and chaotic spelling in the world. English grammar and syntax are easier, for example, than many European languages. Learning to read any of these European languages with a more complicated grammar and syntax can be mastered in less than three months. It takes most U.S. students at least two years to learn to read English, and almost half of U.S. students NEVER become fluent readers.

A careful analysis of the most statistically accurate and comprehensive study of U.S. adult literacy, the Adult Literacy in America report, conclusively proves that a shocking 48.7% of U.S. adults cannot read well enough to hold an above-poverty-level-wage job. This report is available for free study and download, click here. Not only did newspaper reporters downplay the seriousness of the facts in this report, the authors of the report did not take the facts they reported to their logical conclusion as would be possible with some simple ratio-multiplication. The inability to read well enough to hold an above-poverty-level-wage job is the most accurate possible determination of English functional illiteracy. See proof of that statement here. The accuracy of this report was confirmed by a 2006 report, which is also free on the internet (click here.) To see proof that 48.7% of U.S. adults are functionally illiterate and that 31.2% of these functional illiterates are in poverty and that they are more than twice as likely to be in poverty as for all other reasons combined, click here.

Dr. Laubach stated on page 48 of his book, Forty Years With the Silent Billion, “If we spelled English phonetically, American children could be taught to read in a week.” Educationists familiar only with traditional English may be tempted to discount Dr. Laubach’s expertise and claim that is too optimistic, as a way of maintaining the status quo. Learning to read in only three months or less would make American schools equal to schools in other languages. Many other school subjects could be begun two years earlier than they are now.

The school systems in many nations have such high standards that only the best students remain in school. Dr. Rudolph Flesch, on pages 76 and 77 of his book, Why Johnny Can’t Read, explains another important difference:

Generally speaking, students in our schools are about two years behind students of the same age in other countries. This is not a wild accusation of the American educational system; it is an established, generally know fact. . . .

What accounts for these two years? Usually the assumption seems to be that in other countries children and adolescents are forced to study harder. Now that I have looked into this matter of reading, I think the explanation is much simpler and more reasonable: Americans take two years longer to learn to read — and reading, of course, is the basis for achievement in all other subjects.

Although conscientious teachers of the first three grades in school may be frustrated by their inability to teach their students to read, many of the teachers of the first three grades — even including many of these conscientious teachers — do not relish the idea of having to learn to teach new subjects. John Corcoran, who wrote the book, The Teacher Who Couldn’t Read, was a college graduate who taught in a California high school for several years but could hardly read at all. He stated that even though no school teacher ever heard him read aloud correctly, they never seemed to notice. He stated that school teachers are in denial about the problem of non-readers in the schools.

Some of the better students can probably learn to read English spelled phonetically in a week, as Dr. Laubach stated, but it would be a serious mistake to discount Dr. Laubach’s lifetime devotion to teaching students around the world. Even if Dr. Laubach is too optimistic in his assessment, if every student except the most seriously mentally disabled can learn to read in less than three months (instead of the present record of only slightly more than half learning to read in two years or more), everyone who has any compassion for the pain and suffering of illiterates and the cost their illiteracy imposes on every adult, reader and non-reader alike, (more than $5,000 each year for the cost of government programs that illiterates use, the cost of truancy, juvenile delinquency, and crime directly related to illiteracy, and the increased cost of consumer goods due to illiteracy) should be eager to help promote the only proven solution to illiteracy.

To see an overview of our humanitarian project, click here. What we are proposing is very simple: let’s spell our words the way they sound, the way most of the entire world does! As stated at the start of this blog, however, this is not light reading. Due to the natural human avoidance of change, many people have to see a large number of facts before they are willing to make a change. Some skeptical readers will not be convinced by this blog or any or our extensive websites. One thing is certain however: anyone who carefully, honestly reads all of the text of our book, Let’s End Our Literacy Crisis, which is 164 pages and will take about six hours at a normal reading rate, will be convinced that we must stop fighting the symptoms of the problem (the difficulty of English spelling) and solve the problem, by making the spelling simple, dependable, and logical, as Dr. Frank Laubach found effective in more than 300 languages. This is similar to taking aspirin, decongestant, and cough medicine for the symptoms of pneumonia instead of antibiotics to cure it. Visit the Amazon.com website about Let’s End Our Literacy Crisis to see a description of the book, a short history of the development of our humanitarian project, an editorial review by Dr. Robert S. Laubach, past president of Laubach Literacy International, and ten customer reviews of the book, some of them by Amazon Top 500 reviewers, by clicking here.

 

posted by in cause of illiteracy,cost of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,K-12 education,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,teaching fluent reading,teaching reading,U.S. literacy,world literacy and have No Comments

Past History Demands Present Action

Absolutely nothing done in the last ninety years has made a statistically significant improvement in the shockingly high percentage of U.S. students who leave school unable to read English well enough to be functionally literate. The second revision of Let’s End Our Literacy Crisis, to be published in January 2012 by American University & Colleges Press, presents the solution to this problem. The method proposed in the book for solving our literacy crisis has been recommended by numerous educational and linguistic experts for more than 250 years, and thirty-three nations both smaller and larger than the U.S. and both advanced and developing nations have made the type of change the book proposes — but it has never been tried in English. Furthermore, all major objections to what it proposes have been conclusively debunked by several very competent scholars, such as Thomas R. Lounsbury, LL.D, L.H.D., emeritus professor of English, Yale University, in his book, Spelling and Spelling Reform, published in 1909! As a means of avoiding change, however, skeptics keep repeating the same disproven arguments. As our culture has become more complex, the problem of functional illiteracy has now reached crisis proportions, and it is long past time to make the revolutionary changes this book proposes. To see an introduction to the humanitarian project proposed in this exciting, breakthrough book, click on this website: http://LearnToReadNow.org.

posted by in cause of illiteracy,cost of illiteracy,education,end English functional illiteracy,ending illiteracy,extent of illiteracy,K-12 education,learn to read,literacy,reading education,seriousness of illiteracy,teaching fluent reading,teaching reading,U.S. literacy,world literacy and have No Comments